adultmoth:

John Baldessari

adultmoth:

John Baldessari

(via peytonkay)

eviecahir:

Editorial Illustration on ‘Habits’, for Melbourne Publications ‘Voiceworks’.

eviecahir:

Editorial Illustration on ‘Habits’, for Melbourne Publications ‘Voiceworks’.

theladycave:

adamlichi:

Works by Hellen Jo, 2011-2013

(Source: futureshipwreck, via whatisjes)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ryan McGennisken

Works on paper

2014

Via

also is it socially acceptable to put gunsnroses on a mix tape

In other news, I just skyped with my parents. They told me that I shouldn’t have done my taxes, that because I nap too much they worry that I’m suicidal or pregnant, and that when making a big life decision I should, and I quote, “poop on it”.

I have inherited the best adult genes. Also I think we were all a little tipsy and by I think, I mean that we all confessed to having a few brews halfway through.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 21, 1989: Tiananmen Square Protests Begin
On this day in 1989, students began protesting in Tiananmen Square in Beijing, the symbolic central space of China. Several weeks later, when the government sent in the army to end the demonstrations, the citizens of Beijing poured into the streets in support of the students.The demonstrations ended in a massacre on the night of June 3-4, when the government sent the troops into the city with orders to clear Tiananmen Square. One day later, a single, unarmed young man stood his ground before a column of tanks on the Avenue of Eternal Peace. Captured on film and video by Western journalists, this extraordinary confrontation became an icon of the struggle for freedom around the world.
In 2012, FRONTLINE took a look back at how the iconic image of the “tank man” came to be, more than twenty years after the massacre at Tiananmen Square. Photo: A Chinese man stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing’s Changan Blvd. in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. (AP/Jeff Widener)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 21, 1989: Tiananmen Square Protests Begin

On this day in 1989, students began protesting in Tiananmen Square in Beijing, the symbolic central space of China. Several weeks later, when the government sent in the army to end the demonstrations, the citizens of Beijing poured into the streets in support of the students.

The demonstrations ended in a massacre on the night of June 3-4, when the government sent the troops into the city with orders to clear Tiananmen Square. One day later, a single, unarmed young man stood his ground before a column of tanks on the Avenue of Eternal Peace. Captured on film and video by Western journalists, this extraordinary confrontation became an icon of the struggle for freedom around the world.

In 2012, FRONTLINE took a look back at how the iconic image of the “tank man” came to be, more than twenty years after the massacre at Tiananmen Square.

Photo: A Chinese man stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing’s Changan Blvd. in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. (AP/Jeff Widener)

Omg

Omg

(via carrotearrings)

(via somethinglikesomeone)

Now we have two mice and sometimes they visit me in my room. What fun

(Source: deneuveing, via asipofbrandy)

archiemcphee:

German-born artist Gabby Wormann uses painstaking care to combine the delicate bodies of animals such as tarantulas, crabs and winged insects with intricate clockwork mechanisms to create beautiful creatures which she calls MeCre, or mechanical creatures.

"Wormann is interested in humanity’s intervention into complex biological systems, and her work postulates the hybrid forms’ role in the future. To the artist, they symbolize a synthesis between biomass and mechanics that will become part of our evolution. These creatures are more resistant, efficient, and technically optimized for a world where we are focused on continually improving at all costs."

Visit Gabby Wormann’s wesbite to check out more of her remarkable MeCre creations.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

(via coyoteisaboy)

archiemcphee:

For an ongoing guerrilla art project called Goldenroach Hungarian designer and visual artist Miklós Kiss, aka kissmiklos, has been smuggling 14-carat gold-plated bronze cockroaches into museums across Europe, making them part of the. Since 2011 Kiss has secretly placed his roaches inside the Tate Modern, Tate Britain, the British Museum, MUMOK, Hamburger Bahnhof, Centre Pompidou and the Louvre. In addition to sneaking his golden roaches into the galleries themselves, he also places the matching Goldenroach souvenir postcards into the museum gift shops.

On March 25, 2014 Kiss traveled to the US and successfully placed his roaches inside the Museum of Modern Art in New York. That same month the Goldenroach project went from guerrilla art to featured exhibition, entitled Goldenroach Unlimited, at the M0 project space of the Műcsarnok / Kunsthalle in Budapest. There Kiss exhibited a massive assembly of 12,000 plastic Goldenroaches along with one 14-carat gold roach hidden among the the plastic horde. Visitor were even invited to take one plastic Goldenroach home with them.

[via Lost At E Minor]

I think I just had an artgasm. BRIE LOOK AT THIS

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

mpdrolet:

Seeing Montana, 1992
Robert Farber

mpdrolet:

Seeing Montana, 1992

Robert Farber

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

jenjenroux:

~.~


Best quote.

jenjenroux:

~.~

Best quote.

(via veganweedsoup)